Historic Preservation in Sands Point

Local governments throughout the United States have recognized for  years that preservation of historic resources contribute to the quality of life for their residents, fosters greater stability in the neighborhood, creates an appreciation of the area's historic heritage, and enhances the character of community.

Village of Sands Point Historic Landmarks

Sands Point Lighthouse and Lighthouse Keeper's Home - Lighthouse circa 1809, Keeper's Home circa 1868, landmarked 1992.
Hazeldean Manor - circa 1905, landmarked 1995.
Cornwall House - circa 1676, landmarked 1989.
Sands-Nostrand House - circa mid 18th century, landmarked 1989. 
Cockran Gatehouse - circa 1900, landmarked 1992.
Sands-Hewlett-Tibbits House, "Homestead Farm" - circa early 18th century, landmarked 1992. 


Designated areas on the property of The Village Club of Sands Point - landmarked in 2005.
     * Original Gates of the Isaac Guggenheim Estate - circa 1916.
     *  Motts Point - Native American Archeological Site at The 14th Hole of the Golf Course.
     *  Sands Cemetery - an African American 19th century burial site.

Benefits of Owning a Landmark House

  • Owning a piece of history bestows a pedigree and an importance to your home.  You are helping to maintain the character and history of Village of Sands Point for future generations.

  • The Village Historian is also available to you and your ownership will be recorded as a part of the history of the landmark.  A framed photograph of your landmark house will be added to the collection that adorns the walls in Village Hall.

  • Landmark structures are given priority in the building construction permit process to help expedite the time it takes to be approved for a permit.

  • Landmark structures may have a greater market value and provide distinction in the market place.

  • The owner of a Sands Point Historic Landmark house may obtain tax adjustments.

  • The HLPC will assist owners of landmark structures with locating and applying for restoration grants and incentives that are available from different government agencies such as the New York State Offices of Parks, Recreations & Historic Preservation and the National Register of Historic Places.

  • The HLPC will submit historic properties for inclusion in the following publications at the owner's request:  AIA Architectural Guide to Nassau and Suffolk Counties; Long Island/American Institute of Architects; The Society for the Preservation of Long Island Antiquities.

WHAT MAKES A PROPERTY ELIGIBLE?

Structures more than 50 years old may be eligible for landmarking if certain criteria are met.  Only the extensions of a building, those parts seen by the public, are considered.  The site, structure, perimeter walls, gates or cemeteries must have architectural merit, exemplify a historic method of construction or be associated with a period, persons or events of historic significance.  Buildings should be close to their original condition.

HOW IS A BUILDING OR SITE NOMINATED FOR LANDMARK DESIGNATION?

The owner of the property, an interested resident, a community group or the Commission itself may nominate any building or site within the confines of the Village for designation as a landmark.  Application forms are available at the Village Hall.  The application must be supported by documentation that establishes the architectural/historic significance.

WHAT DOES IT MEAN IF I AM CONTACTED BY THE HISTORIC LANDMARK PRESERVATION COMMISSION AND HOW IS AN APPLICATION FOR DESIGNATION AS LANDMARK REVIEWED?

Your property has come to our attention and we are calling to see if you are interested in landmarking before any formal action is taken.  Once a formal application is received or submitted by the Commission itself, it is the Commission's responsibility to have its members visit the site and to officially notify and invite the owner and all neighbors with 900 feet of the site to a public hearing on the application.  After the hearing, the Commission must vote within thirty days on whether to approve the application.  All meetings of the Commission considering the application are open to the public.  After the Commission votes to designate the site or structure as a Sands Point Historic Landmark, their recommendation is presented to the Village Board of Trustees.  The Trustees make the final decision.  If the site is denied designation as a landmark, the Commission may resubmit the application in one year.

HOW DOES THE VILLAGE OF SANDS POINT DESIGNATION OF A SITE AS A HISTORIC LANDMARK DIFFER FROM A LISTING OF THE SITE IN THE NATIONAL LANDMARK REGISTERS?

The goals of the State and National Registers at the Village of Sands Point Historic Landmark Preservation Commission are similar to protect and preserve sites that are important to history.  The registers are the official lists of properties and sites that are significant in history, architecture, engineering, landscape design, archaeology a culture within the state and/or national context.  Thus, even though a site is designated a Sands Point Landmark, it is not automatically placed in the New York State and National Register.  There is a separate application process for each of these Registers.  However, the State and National Registers tend to look favorably upon applications for listing on behalf of properties that are locally designated landmarks.  So far the Village of Sands Point has two listings in the National Register of Historic Places: the Sands Family Burial Ground and the John Philip Sousa House. 

IF MY PROPERTY HAS LANDMARK STATUS CAN I CHANGE ANYTHING?

There is often a perception that once a site/structure has landmark status, the owner is not allowed to make any changes or upgrades, or perform any work on the site/structure.  THIS IS NOT TRUE!  All plans for demolition, alteration/additions or improvement of the external features of a Village Historic Landmark must be reviewed and approved by the Village Historic Landmarks Preservation Commission and the Village Building Inspector.  This is done to ensure that proposed changes are in keeping with the architectural style and period of the site.  The Commission usually works closely with the property owner to achieve the owner's goals in a practical manner while maintaining the historical quality of the landmark.  New materials or substitute materials approved by the Commission may be used when authentic materials are not available or are financially out of reach.  Owners of a landmarked property/site may do as they wish to the interior of the site as long as the renovations preserve the external appearance of the structure.

IF MY PROPERTY ALREADY HAS LANDMARK STATUS, WILL I NEED TO OPEN THE PROPERTY UP TO THE PUBLIC?

No. The public may view the outside of private structure/sites from waterways or public roads.  The Landmark Law does not require letting the public in for tours.

HISTORIC PRESERVATION FACTS

NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARKS IN THE VILLAGE OF SANDS POINT FACTS

  • There are 11 landmarked sites in Sands Point.

  • Sands Point has two listings in the National Register of Historic Places: the Sands Family Burial Ground and the John Philip Sousa House.

  • John Philip Sousa House "Wildbank" - circa 1907, landmarked 1991

  • Sands Family Cemetery - circa 1704, landmarked 1990.

Sands Point Civic Association, Inc. 
Mailing Address
P.O. Box 645
Port Washington, New York
11050

Copyright 2017  Sands Point Civic Association, Inc.